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Summer 2008 Vol 34 No 3
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Embracing Fine Threads
By Joyce E. Hayes


My journey towards small format tapestry looks much like a bell curve.  I began small with prints and drawings, progressed to large paintings and bound-woven rugs, and back down again to my current small format tapestries.…

Small formats are a good fit for me.  I enjoy the precision and detail oriented approach that it demands, and I appreciate that no space is wasted.  Every square inch must count. 



below: Joyce Hayes, Conciliation - Peace  12.5" x 12.87"  Linen warp, cotton sewing thread weft on watercolor paper background, acrylic paints and colored pencil.  Photographer - Art and Soul




below: Joyce Hayes, Bach 2 Part Invention #1   10.87" x 16"   Linen warp, cotton sewing thread and metallics for weft on watercolor paper background, acrylic paint and colored pencil.   Photographer - Cecil Hayes




below: Joyce Hayes, Bach 2 Part Invention #3,   12" x 16.25"   Linen warp, cotton sewing thread and metallics for weft on watercolor paper background, acrylic paint and colored pencil.   Photographer - Art and Soul




The Value of Limits
By Ruth Manning


I used to weave large tapestries. … Life is always changing.  Some might call this “opportunities for growth” … in the past six years that’s what happened to me. … [Now] I only weave the very small.  My looms are two 10-inch pipe looms … the “Archie Looms.”… My working space is one corner of the middle room with a window and a spot for my cup of coffee, probably 8 square feet of working space. … Yes, I am very limited these days, but somehow, some way, and perhaps because of that, my work has grown.



below: Ruth Manning, Market Day, detail 6" x 6.5"  2007




below: Ruth Manning, Turning Pages,  9" x 18"    2008




below: Ruth Manning, Morning on the Palmetto,  9.5" x 4"  2008




below: Ruth Manning, View of Una Casita, 10" x 9" 2008




Thoughts on Weaving Small Format Tapestries
By Kathe Todd-Hooker


Since childhood I have loved handwork that I can carry with me.  My Grandmothers - one raised in a subsistence culture and one who was considered “upper crust” - believed that a person should stay busy.  They always had projects that could be shoved in a pocket.…

I am a child of my grandmothers. When I began weaving, my love of small handwork transferred to small format/small scale pieces. … Small work invites you to stand closer, to become intimate with the piece. … One’s experience with the work is more private.



below: Kathe Todd-Hooker, After glow, 2" x 9.5"  Weft: sewing thread -embroidery floss-cotton and rayon; Warp: dual duty craft thread Epi 20-22




below: Kathe Todd-Hooker, Home, 7.5" x 5"  Weft: sewing thread, embroidery floss cotton; Warp: dual duty craft thread Epi 20-22




below: Kathe Todd-Hooker, Lions Rest - Cape Ariago, 5" x 7"  Weft: sewing thread, embroidery floss cotton and rayon; Warp: dual duty craft thread Epi 20-22




below: Kathe Todd-Hooker, What Spider women could have told Icarus and Ikotomi,  8" x 4.5" Weft: sewing thread, embroidery floss cotton; Warp: dual duty craft thread Epi 20-22




below: Kathe Todd-Hooker, So Many Words, 10" x 17"  Weft: sewing thread, embroidery floss cotton, rayon, cotton darning thread, linen floss; Warp: dual duty craft thread Epi 20-22




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